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20121205
20121213
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just getting a paycheck, you really don't understand how government can affect that firsthand. that was one of the things that led me to think this is a useful idea for a book. >> overall, philosophically, how do you see the role of government, the role of congress, the role of the president in the economy? >> basically this book raises and answers the question. we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and create jobs. when government battles too much in the economy, its policies are driven by politics and markets are driven by individuals and the real world music people. that's the difference between what government does about markets do. you need government to protect us from fraud, from wrongdoers. there are wrongdoers the government can protect us from them. overly meddlesome government goes to fire and you end up suppressing enterprise and innovation and job creation. >> 2008 financial situation and the so-called bailout. are you supportive of that government intervention? >> release the question and answer of the book basically. you ca
of these are entrepreneurs who are not seeking special government leaders. the big banks, the goldman sachs of the world were all internet government and the government itself is mandating the purchase of these credit defaults on its and other devices which ended up bringing down the economy. it's not procapitalist to support goldman sachs and the internment embrace of the department of the treasury. >> is supply-side economics is quick >> surprise side economics is true economics. i actually am quite excited to have mitt romney running for president because they & co. was one of the providers of the foundation of supply-side economics. they apply to business. they showed the most effective way for businesses to gain share -- market share to cut their prices. we will cut prices that their business market share because costs are out by about 20 to 30% with each doubling of total units that were sold. the cost in general, economies of scope and scale of learning is called a learning curve. this is really the foundation of supply-side economics. why when you cut taxes, which are just like a prize, you reduce co
market share, which meets the lower cost and more prosperity. this is both for the government, which also administers price is. they are called taxes. so lower tax rates expand the economy and we need more revenues for the government and less zero-sum struggles over government favors. >> we been talking books tv but george gilder, author of several books with the new addition of george gilder, which came out originally in the early 80s. this is a tv on c-span 2. >> now i program from the up to the archives. fatima bhutto kameny said former pakistani prime minister, benazir bhutto, talks about growing up in a family powerbrokers. may suffer chronicles her close relatives including her own father who were assassinated by political. benazir bhutto was sworn in as prime minister of pakistan on december 2nd come in 1888. this is about an hour 15. >> back at home this evening. in the kitchen cooking at winning to my parents bedroom and sat as they watch television on the bed. he was a little child then in this so easy to take care of. we were lazily watching boston's ace, a show made in the 19t
we have some kind of government mechanism in place to ensure that to mortgages can always be a portable? i submit that the historical record of the past 70 years suggest that when it comes to housing, congress will have a hard time trusting the market. thank you. [applause] >> great comments. this brings us to our discussants. the first will be tom who has been in the mortgage research business for a mere 35 years. a long-standing critic in government sponsored enterprises and has great perspective on the fateful history which bob is so well chronicled. tom was previously with mortgage guaranty insurance corporation, asset-backed capital research, and wholesale access research and consultancy firm. tom issued early warnings of the increasing risk at fannie mae, about which he was correct, and, of course, ignored. our second discussing, ed pinto is a former executive vice president and chief credit officer of fannie mae, so he's lived in part of his history. as an aei fellow ed has considered groundbreaking research on the contributions of government housing policy for the
to small city governments, county governments doing local research to document, his goal was to document every single person executed in this country. one of the persons that espy piled information on was the youngest person to be executed in the united states in the 20th century. and if you think about the history of capital punishment, some themes draw out. one of the themes is the execution of children. this has been debated, and ideas and perspectives have been given on this, is it right to execute children. another theme is, is it proper to execute people who are mentally ill? another issue that is drawn out in the history of capital punishment is the factor of race in determining sentencing of capital punishment. it's been statistically proven by david ball discuss and others that race is a mitigating factor in capital punishment sentencing. so these themes of race, of executing the young, executing the mentally ill are some of the themes that you can draw out of the collection. so here we have george stinney. george was 14 years old when he was convicted of killing an 11-year-old
laissez-faire to a powerful market governance in the public interest. from dishonest prices to honest ones, from commodification to protection of the commons. in the corporation from shareholder primacy to stakeholder primacy. from one ownership and motivational model to new business models involving alternative forms of ownership and to the democratization of capital. in money and finance from wall street the main street, from money created through bank debt to money created by government. in economic growth from today's growth fetish to postgrowth society from mere gdp growth to growth in human welfare and in democratically-determined priorities. in social conditions from economic insecurity to security for vast inequities to fundamental fairnesses from joblessness to good jobs for all who seek them. in indicators from gdp, grossly distorted picture, to accurate measures of social and environmental health and the quality of life. in consumerism from consumerism and influenza to sufficiency and mindful consumption, from more to enough, from owning to sharing. in communities from runaway e
't say compromise is difficult, governing is difficult, however, as politicians, what do we remember hatch for? for passing great legislation to protect health care. we're not going to remember politicians for their cowardness, but for their courage. we're in the going to remember them positively for cowardness, but their courage. we are calling on politicians to exercise leadership. there's a set of reforms that would make it easier to compromise, reforming the filibuster, open primaries, rather than close primaries. limiting the amount of money that is politics. the problem is you can't get reforms without compromise so we all have our favorite reforms. politicians need to mix mind sets and lead, and that's imminently possible. >> host: you write on restraining the rhetoric, a third strategy of agreeing is to agree on the fact disagreement occurs on most issues, and it's not usually yielding agreement let alone general consensus. what do you mean? >> guest: well, what we mean is that we have a polarized politics right now, and if each side stems on favorite principles, we'll get no
to that position which hadn't existed before in the united states government, assistance secretary of the navy. >> there had been something called a chief clerk for years, but the idea of having an assistant secretary, what would be the point of that? there's nothing for him to do. and the job of chief clerk had already been promised elsewhere, and lincoln was told, but we can't -- >> but o do you assessment of naval commanders in chief. >> i believe both secretaries of the navy were very competent, and i would disagree they had little experience. i think being a salvage lawyer in key west and chairman of the naval committee was a lot of experience for mallory, and gideon welles had a lot of experience, the navy at the time was administered by a series of bureaus, steam engineering and so forth. and he was the bureau of clothing and provisions. which means he was the logistics guy for the navy. he was the only civilian to have that guy. everybody else was a navy captain. it would be like having somebody on the joint chiefs of staff who was in a civilian suit. so he really did have some experie
our government to take health from the list of luxury to be bought only with money and add it to the list containing inalienable rights of every citizen. we don't know whether franklin roosevelt ever heard about florence greenberg's unprecedented call for health care as a right. even though he had endorsed the conference, he chose to go on vacation. fdr was actually on a cruise. i guess we can't really blame him, pretty well deserved vacation the three years earlier, fdr had refused to include medical coverage as part of the social security act because he did not want to antagonize the american medical profession. he did send a message of support to the conference but not long afterward the outbreak of world war ii force the president's attention elsewhere. five years later on january 11th, 1944, in his state of the union address roosevelt spoke to the american people about the war and especially about the kind of peace the allies planned to establish after the defeat of fascism. one supreme objective for the future can be summed up in one word, security. and that means not
. they can't even take care of their own bodily functions and they want >> the government. if you can't p you are not changing anything, you stupid stupid jerks. anyway. the chapter -- two chapters on that. i focus on how the media demonized the tea party and lionized occupy wall street. i will get into why they did it later in the third hour of the speech. other areas, everybody has a border but if you talk about a border you are a racist. grant has a border. they don't deserve one but they have one. our military is treated on campuses with in tolerance. if you organize a care package delivery to afghanistan there will be professors and students and activists groups who say why are we sending stuff to people who care -- kill babies. i don't get it. i don't have anything beyond those people are idiots because they allow people like bill heirs to teach. they give accolades to terrorists yet they give no respect to our troops. there's a chapter in my book on that. conservative women, any -- you have the toughest job because feminists hate you and they go out of their way to demonize you even th
and we studied it every week because we didn't have to govern. they were winning the house. the minority is still going when he switched sides and became the republican. if you are the majority you have to have an idea to hold hearings and mark up the bill and go to the conference with the senate and get something done. if you are the minority you get to go. [laughter] >> hon. that becomes a self perpetuating metal. and more or less i would say house republican is to get a grip. they are the majority, they are not the minority. they don't need to cave in to obama or four may surrender caucus. the senators will do what ever senators do. it is an institution on which individual with a totally dominates team work to feed each senator is a unique figure and somehow fashions out what they are going to do. you are not going to in the short run in the minority organize the senate republicans in terms of actually being able to do something positive you organize and do - things which route to get them to magically come up with a formula there will always be five or six different versions dependin
-author of this book, the spirit of compromise, white governing demands it and campaigning undermines it. president, are we a politically compromising nation? >> we were created in compromise. a lot of people think of the revolutionary war, which separated us from our mother country, but if you recall, i know you weren't there then, but if you recall it -- historically speaking our founding fathers crafted a compromise that created the constitution. they were as polarized as any set of americans who had been throughout our country and history. there were a pro and anti slavery and yet they compromised. so, yes, we were founded in compromise. today compromise has become more difficult than ever before. >> what do you mean when you talk about the uncompromising mindset? >> well, we live in an era that has been characterized as a permanent campaign where every day is election day. and campaigning and elections make for uncompromising line sets. you stand on your principles to mobilize your base, draw in endless amounts now of money. the 24 / seven news cycle covers politics as if it is a horse race in
-elected representation and articulation of goals to an elected -- elected -- a transitional government and then an elected government, both on the national and the local level, and that's -- you don't see that elsewhere, at least not in that striking as a fashion. in the rest of the book, i talk about the personality of gadhafi, what motivated him, and people argue that the personalities of the dictators themselves don't matter. in the case of libya, that's not quite true. gadhafi was a mercurial, i believe a quite intelligent person who had certain fixations and -- i'll try to be diplomatic here because -- [laughter] there's a lot of strangeness there that motivated his behavior in ways which i think were so bizarre that many of the people who are looking at this from the u.s. policy side -- felt, in a way, they were accustomed to the way of thinking about things, and that posed problems when you try to anticipate what he was going to do or respond to him. for example, you know, after the 1986 bombing in benghazi and tripoli, gadhafi was rumored to have gone into a tremendous funk for
is obsessed because it is with the honor of government service. he believes inflation undermines trust in government that the government will not abuse the rights as citizens to print money. this is the most overlooked but fundamental item for the evil of inflation. trust brings me to the lesson of the book to enjoy the benefits of consuming more than we produce because the world uses the dollar has international money. there are many reasons for the supremacy but the most fundamental is to not debate the concert -- currency by inflating the would be sore the tested going forward and thus we get the long term employment budget under control. i show ultimately he controlled inflation by refusing to monetize the budget deficit. the problem began october 79 to drive down inflation from 12% down of 4% by 1982 it was down at 4% but the final victory for interest-rate after congress passed a balanced budget amendment called the gramm-rudman go the proposed draconian cuts in government spending less congress passed a balanced budget. sound familiar? one of the sponsors of the bill said it was
at the federal government and he gets the federal government to come in the federal government brings archaeologist. they find some stuff but in the end, and historian in team of archaeologists writes his this paper. they write the official congressional report and they say that the maryland regiment was truly brave and while they did this you know, tremendous, this important thing, it is no more important than anything anyone else did in the war. something to that effect which you know, i mean you could just see jamie kelly saying oh my god, please note don't let this be the report but you can also just sit there and say wow, whose actions are more important than his other actions in who gets to judge? he gets even sadder for me, so, but somebody is recently talking about trying to find the site again and i knew and historian who is trying to get the sonar so maybe someday they will. >> to me, it's undeniable the amnesia, knowing new york city history as a hopeless claim and he you just get more depressed all the time. is it just a trump principle that real estate takes precedence ov
and he stayed involved working for the american government. those three were very seriously injured early in their time in north africa, which is in a way why they survived. >> rachel cox, this is your book, "into dust and fire: five young americans who went first to fight the nazis." we didn't want to give voice to much of the indian. we gave away a little of it. rachel cox has another uncle who became rather notorious, and that is who? >> archibald cox to everyone in my family called him uncle bill. nobody knows why. that was his nickname. maybe just didn't like being called archie, i don't know spent so you called him uncle bill? >> yes. >> he is well-connected to the watergate era. what do you remember about that era? >> well, i think the general feeling was that it was characteristic of him to resign when his put in a position. i guess he was fired actually. he didn't resign, but anyway, he left. he wouldn't be with the president told him to do what he felt it to be illegal and against his convictions. and he left. so it kind of fits with what uncle robbie did. they're a family who
american jews is declining by overwhelming evidence the israeli government after treatment of the palestinians is unjustified. this is about two hours. [applause] >> thank you very much for that lovely introduction. i want to thank karen, colin robinson and john oakes. the american jewish romance with israel is both ordinary and extraordinary. american jewish concern over israel is not so different from the long-distance nationalism of cuban-americans, irish-americans, indian americans and palestinian americans who are physically in the state that virtually or vicariously over there but the differences are no less important to make this a special case. very few american jews are of is really gorgeous. israel as always been projection screen for american jews, phantasmagorical region of the mind as much as an actual country. another more salient distinction is the exceptional physician that israel occupies, israel is america's closest ally of part from saudi arabia. in spite of its small population the jewish by considerable margin the biggest recipient of u.s. aid $3 billio
pretty staggering in terms of what your government. a lot of wonderful topics that people like me resonate to. net 1951, questions about derivatives, all sorts of questions and issues that about class stiegel. pretty interesting in terms of the depth and the capability of thinking about those issues. it turns out there should be careful using the word magisterial because i had to look it up. it means both authoritative and pedantic, don't mean it in that sense. >> i would like to start. often multinational corporations populated by the states and all depends on many states to see it , see to it that these things done. the american states have played an exceptional role in the creation of elite global capitalism and coordinating its management as well as restructuring other states to these ends. so i think it gives me a little frantic think a little bit of a what you've done your, and i just want to ask you a little bit about what you mean by globalization and why free r freer trade is essential to its achievement and maybe even what is. free enterprise. >> well, and the sense that
>> one of those remarkable services that the government has designed and funded in order to do what our democracy needs to do and that is to be sure again everyone has that access to be well-informed citizens and to be able to fully participate in all the things that our democracy has to offer. .. and i'm going to jump in. i found this book in the middle of the atlantic ocean. six years ago, in we are newed d.a. i embarked on a sailing ship. the ssv. i would be at sea for three weeks. away from telephone, internet, and physical libraries. i was in the middle of research project on ben franklin that required know read material at french. i tried to revive my french by reading a novel. i chose a small book "around the world in 180 days qghts. first pub -- i slowly made my way through the book. my french was good enough i enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated the period detail. especially the nature of the bet that sends protagonist racing around the world. at the london club, he marks offhand edly that scheduled travel schedules could take a world around the 180 dares. th
constitution gave the government the power to do certain things. this had not commenced as the 1930's. >> again, the november 2012 elections. >> that no one to talk about 2012. and tired of 2012. less talk about the future. 2012 was a very difference. were going to have to figure out a way to appeal to a bitter electorate. >> a year running for president? >> that is classified. your parents is not high enough to your hat. i wouldn't -- want to be part of the national debate. >> government bullies, the second book by senator rand paul, however day americans are being harassed and abused by an imprisoned by the fed's. >> now on book tv a history of the american revolution with the focus on the middle colonies. new york, new jersey, and portions of pennsylvania. the author recalls the importance of the region during the war and visits several sites to document their historical significance and it plans date today. from washington's crossing of the dollar to the battle of brooklyn, it is about an hour and 15. [applause] >> this subtitle of this book is old irishman. it is a great honor
as they share revulsion at the thought of tying up two branches of government for months and diverting millions of taxpayer dollars to a trial the public would quickly unmasked as a political and motivated ploy prompted house leaders to simply allow americans to assess his personal indiscretions for themselves. this noble gesture restraint continues to inform the conduct of republicans to the state. >> on that note of like to read the entry for homosexuality >> on that note. sexual attraction between politically conservative or evangelical white males. some sexuality is characterized by wearing navy blue or gray suits with red ties, frequent church attendance, and public denunciation of other homosexuals. many occupy positions of authority and it can beat -- in can be found working as republican school board members, republican activists, a christian men's group leaders and republican legislators. prominent homosexuals include roy aspirin and larry craig. ted haggard. >> prominent. >> we will do a couple more. >> donald trump. >> well, he might be in the book. >> we to have the entry for asshol
and government was great. they didn't give a damn. they supported as much as possible coming across the border as long as the ship was paid in excise tasked you could tax since before the united states. but joseph kennedy limited and he refused to pay the excise tax people said here's the program here is the smoking gun. well i found this kennedy and i looked at the business records and the tax records and so no bootlegging of any sort. here and then we will go across to what extent did john kennedy know of his father's relationships with multiple women. [laughter] >> yes and i think there are no cavities in the audience here jack was much more predatory even then his father was joe kennedy spent, joe kennedy and rose had an arrangement much like her father fi had an arrangement with rose's mother and then do whatever the hell i want, and he didn't. he tried not to embarrass rose. i don't think jack had that same code that is inexcusable, gloria swanson, one of the things i found as i went to austin texas to see the glorious papers and i teach ph.d. students i'm the only historian who's made t
bought the government got involved in addition to the book sellers, and it really got well-organized to the point where basically every kid in the country get money to go in and buy a book, and the bookstores sort of, you know, price them in a nice way. this won't be as big yet, but i think we're giving away a half a million books. >> right. >> it's a start, and you know, once again, we just -- what we really need more than anything else is for the government to wake up or the various governments whether it's going to be handled at -- whether you're states person or a federal person, it's got to be dealt with somewhere, and education same thing. i mean, we're not figuring it out right for some reason. >> let me ask you on a personal note, were you a strong reader as a kid? >> i was a strong reader, a very good student, but i was not a big reader. >> when did that -- >> i grew up on comic books. >> did you? >> yeah. >> when did the book thing start? >> the book thing, really -- and i was a good student, but the book thing really happened by accident. i was -- i worked my way
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)